Custom-training-icon.png This page is under construction. It needs to be improved in order to conform to wiki standards.

Reason: Needs to include information about the Epic Games Store and Steam downloads being discontinued.
ComicalNinja [Talk] 14:32, 6 January 2021 (UTC)

Rocket League is a video game that involves the combination of car racing and soccer, created and developed by Psyonix Studios. In the game, two teams of players are pitted against each other in a futuristic arena to duke it out in five-minute matches. Rocket League is the sequel to Supersonic Acrobatic Rocket-Powered Battle-Cars (known as SARPBC), which was created by the same developer.

The game was released on July 7, 2015 on PlayStation 4 and Steam, with the Xbox One release coming the next year on February 17, 2016.[3] On September 8, 2016, a beta version was made available on Steam for Linux (via SteamOS) and Mac OS X.[4] On June 13, 2017, Psyonix made headlines when it announced that Rocket League would be coming to Nintendo Switch later in the year.[5] It was revealed that it would be released on the Switch on November 14.

On January 23, 2020, Psyonix announced it would end support for Rocket League on the macOS and Linux (SteamOS) platforms. The final patch for these platforms was in March 2020.[6] Since then, the macOS and Linux versions are longer updated or supported. Players on these platforms can download and install a version of the game, but many features will not function as expected. Online functionality (including all in-game purchases) is disabled in this version, but offline features including Local Matches and split-screen play are still accessible. Psyonix mentioned in a support article at the time that there are a few third-party tools which may allow users to still run the game properly on macOS and Linux, but that these tools are officially not supported by Psyonix.[7]

Rocket League has been critically praised, and has won numerous awards. The game has been popular on the streaming platform Twitch and has both a casual and competitive atmosphere.

Gameplay

Rocket League's gameplay expands on the original title, Supersonic Acrobatic Rocket-Powered Battle-Cars. Players control a rocket-powered car and use it to direct a ball larger than the cars into the opposing team's goal in an arena. There are five minutes in a match and the team with the highest score wins. If the two teams are tied at the end of the five minutes, then the winner is determined in a sudden-death overtime period.

Off the field, players can customize their vehicles in numerous ways. There are many ways to earn items for use on one's car or player banner. Also, most items can be exchanged between players via the trading system.

The game is played by one or more players on each team, locally or online. The game features "cross-platform play" on both PS4 and PC, which means that players on either platform will be able to play together. Xbox cross-platform play is not available as of now, due to problems caused by Sony.[citation needed]

Additional Releases

The following editions of Rocket League have been released, in addition to the base game:

Reception

Rocket League received "generally positive reviews" according to the review aggregator website Metacritic, scoring 87/100, 86/100, 85/100 and 86/100 on Metacritic for the Xbox One,[8] PC,[9] PS4[10] and Nintendo Switch[11] versions respectively.

Critics praised both the fact that it is "addictive and fun", as well as the visuals, which "are brilliantly detailed" and "crisp",[12] while the community on Slant collectively agreed that the game is perfect for quick, short play sessions, making it one of the best choices for couch co-op play.[13]

Trailers

Behind the Scenes

Although not much is known about the universe in which Rocket League takes place, Psyonix founder Dave Hagewood did say the following in a 2015 interview with Game Informer:

That's always been a big question for us. We thought about it for a long time. What is this world that we're making? We don't have a definitive answer on even big things like, "Are these full-sized cars in an insanely-large arena or are these small RC cars or micro-machines?" It says a lot that our focus is on gameplay and making the game fun for the fun of it. We have some ideas that we talk about that we haven't really exposed to people, but for the most part, we've always just kind of said, "Accept it for what it is."[14]

See also

References

External Links

Community content is available under CC-BY-SA unless otherwise noted.